A human approach to world peace. The Dalai Lama On A Human Approach To World Peace 2019-01-08

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A Human Approach to World Peace

a human approach to world peace

The West Bengal Minister of State for Education, Mr Partha Chatterjee was again among the guests, who also included students from St. There is a school of thought that warns us to refrain from politics altogether, as politics has become synonymous with amorality. Then, later, they could meet to discuss mutual and global problems. We must set an example by our own practice, for we cannot hope to convince others of the value of religion by mere words. In order to bring about this great adjustment, we need to revive our humanitarian values.

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The Dalai Lama on a Human Approach to World Peace

a human approach to world peace

Violence always produces misery and thus is essentially counter-productive. Anger is one of the most serious problems facing the world today. With the rise of a few big powers in the international arena, the humanitarian role of international organizations is being bypassed and neglected. All religions agree upon the necessity to control the undisciplined mind that harbours selfishness and other roots of trouble, and each teaches a path leading to a spiritual state that is peaceful, disciplined, ethical, and wise. Rather, I speak simply as a human being, as an upholder of the humanitarian values that are the bedrock not only of Mahayana Buddhism but of all the great world religions.

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Explaining a Human Approach to World Peace at Presidency University

a human approach to world peace

Today we are so interdependent, so closely interconnected with each other, that without a sense of universal responsibility, a feeling of universal brotherhood and sisterhood, and an understanding and belief that we really are part of one big human family, we cannot hope to overcome the dangers to our very existence — let alone bring about peace and happiness. We should think about them in terms of human benefit in the long run rather than the short term. We can make similar arguments for other religions as well. It is my firm belief that in order to solve human problems in all their dimensions, we must combine and harmonize economic development with spiritual growth. Bengal, India on January 13, 2015.

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A Human Approach to World Peace ~ His Holiness The Dalai Lama of Tibet

a human approach to world peace

Under present conditions, there is definitely a growing need for human understanding and a sense of universal responsibility. The answer is not the development and use of greater military force, nor an arms race. Finally, a few words about material progress. The wiser course is to think of others also when pursuing our own happiness. And the key to peace of mind today is not necessarily religion but secular ethics. For, according to Buddhist theory, we are born and reborn countless numbers of times, and it is conceivable that each being has been our parent at one time or another. We should think about them in terms of human benefit in the long run rather than the short term.

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Explaining a Human Approach to World Peace at Presidency University

a human approach to world peace

By implementing ahimsa, non-violence, we have the opportunity to avoid violence and develop a more human approach to resolving conflicts peacefully. Further, the Tibetan Buddhist tradition teaches us to view all sentient beings as our dear mothers and to show our gratitude by loving them all. His Holiness reiterated that peace of mind is the key to good health. In their quest of happiness, humans have used different methods, which all too often have been cruel and repellent. They are not thinking of the earth and the long-term effects on universal life as a whole. This type of compassion is what we must strive to cultivate in ourselves, and we must develop it from a limited amount to the limitless. Religious leaders and humanitarians all over the world have a special role to play in this respect.


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The Dalai Lama on a Human Approach to World Peace

a human approach to world peace

It is from this perspective that I welcome efforts being made in various parts of the world for better understanding among religions. In this regard there are two things important to keep in mind: self-examination and self-correction. Right from the moment of our birth, we are under the care and kindness of our parents; later in life, when facing the sufferings of disease and old age, we are again dependent on the kindness of others. Whether they belong to more evolved species like humans or to simpler ones such as animals, all beings primarily seek peace, comfort, and security. Unfortunately, such ideas have been cheated by selfishness.


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A human approach to world peace (Book, 1984) [www.rcsydney.com]

a human approach to world peace

The premise behind this idea of universal responsibility is the simple fact that, in general terms, all others' desires are the same as mine. May this essay serve as an urgent reminder lest we forget the human values that unite us all as a single family on this planet. He repeated again that the only genuine option for creating peace is dialogue. A universal humanitarian approach to world problems seems the only sound basis for world peace. I have written the above lines To tell my constant feeling. Each religion works in its own way to lessen human suffering and contribute to world civilization.

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Explaining a Human Approach to World Peace at Presidency University

a human approach to world peace

I see nothing wrong with material progress per se, provided people are always given precedence. Life is as dear to the mute animal as it is to any human being; even the simplest insect strives for protection from dangers that threaten its life. A universal humanitarian approach to world problems seems the only sound basis for world peace. Another result of spiritual development, most useful in day-to-day life, is that it gives a calmness and presence of mind. Hatred and fighting cannot bring happiness to anyone, even to the winners of battles. We practitioners of different faiths can work together for world peace when we view different religions as essentially instruments to develop a good heart — love and respect for others, a true sense of community. Rather, I speak simply as a human being, as an upholder of the humanitarian values that are the bedrock not only of Mahayana Buddhism but of all the great world religions.

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A Human Approach to World Peace

a human approach to world peace

Right from the moment of our birth, we are under the care and kindness of our parents; later in life, when facing the sufferings of disease and old age, we are again dependent on the kindness of others. When your attachment changes, your kindness also changes; it may disappear. Still, in religion there are no national boundaries. If we, as intelligent human beings, do not accept this fact, there will be more and more suffering on this planet. More than ever before, we witness today how ethics and noble principles are obscured by the shadow of self-interest, particularly in the political sphere.

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